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orwell poster


Do you believe we aren’t living ‘1984’ in 2016?  The educational thought police are everywhere via data collection.  As a parent, you don’t see the data collected on your child online from surveys, teachers, and assessments.  But if you read the statements of educational vendors and national/state/local bureaucrats, they have told you they are data mining your children’s thoughts, attitudes, behaviors and values.

If you didn’t read Cheri Kiesiecker’s post from yesterday on Naviance, read it now.  From Naviance not so transparent- and cooking up data starting in kindergarten?:



Naviance seems to be capitalizing on the push to combine school and workforce readiness. In most states, Naviance is started in high school, or even middle school.    But…why leave those elementary kids un-tracked?

Naviance, (Hobsons),  has just rolled out their workforce young children program.  See Hobsons’ press release and why they think it is important to start thinking about a career plan in Kindergarten and how schools should “integrate college and career exploration into elementary classrooms. ”

You can see how 10 year old Colorado students are used in this commercial for Naviance in Elementary schools.


What’s next Naviance?  “Workforce for babies”?  Maybe “Workforce in the Womb”?

While we hope that every child can learn ABOUT college and career options —we wonder how much Hobsons, Naviance is learning ABOUT our children.  As Hobsons states, they gather information on students’ “strengths and interests, and learn how what they’re doing in school…” …”particularly low-income and minority students.”


It must be pretty lucrative because Microsoft just announced that they are getting in on this school-career data gathering business.

Meet Microsoft’s CirkledIn who promises to Capture-Connect-Collaborate Compile and track kids’ and students’ school life achievements. [and] Share their holistic profile. Starting in pre-school.

No thanks.

We know our kids, we don’t need your  full-time, non-transparent,  data tracking.

na na na na,  hey hey hey, Goodbye.


Referring to today’s graphic and the practice of data mining your child’s thoughts, attitudes, behaviors and beliefs;  Did the world not read George Orwell’s work?  Are parents content in allowing data mining of their children to be supplied as capital for the workforce?  Can these parents not translate the CCSSI newspeak and other education reform phrases which are detrimental to children?

Reacquaint yourself with ‘1984’.  You have several options:

  • For the visual learner, the e-book can be accessed free from
  • For the auditory learner, the book can be listened to on youtube as an audiory book:
  • For those adept deciphering British dialect, here is an adaptation of the book (courtesy of via a 1965 radio transmission:


Just as the first radio play of 1984 warned of a “disturbing broadcast,” this 1965 version begins, “The following play is not suitable for those of a nervous disposition.” It’s interesting that even this long after the novel’s publication, and in the midst of the swinging sixties, Orwell’s dystopian fable still had the power to shock. Or at least the producers of this broadcast thought so. Perhaps we’ve been so thoroughly inured to the prospects Orwell warned of that revelations of the NSA’s massive data collection, or of the global expropriation disclosed by the Panama Papers, or of any number of nefarious government dealings often elicit a cynical shrug from the average person. Those who do express alarm at such documented abuses are often branded… well, alarmists.


Education reform alarmists have been branded by education reformers as tin foil hat wearers.  There’s the 1984 newspeak present in 2016.  The alarmists are the parents and taxpayers who have accessed government documents, NGO websites and are the ones speaking actual truth.  As noted in the above paragraph, the documented abuse of data mining children and selling their information to unknown vendors without your permission or payment for personal data is acknowledged by NGOs and state/federal governmental agencies, so the tin foil hat label is just another example of newspeak:




It’s 1984 in America.  What are we going to do about it?  Do we want this to continue to be our current reality?  Are our children a version of Winston? Do we want the data gatherers, education reformers, bureaucrats and directing brains determining our children’s futures?  From Chapter 4:


1984 excerpt


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