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deleted tweet nielsen
From a twitter archive.


With all the Social Emotional Learning Standards emphasized in Common Core, you wonder how a Common Core Lesson Plan would address the following video in which a young woman berates a Lyft driver for having a hula girl figurine on his dashboard.  The doll triggering the meltdown probably would have looked like this (below).  Do you think having such a figurine on a dashboard signifies racist behavior?


hawaiian bobblehead


The passenger was highly indignant, profane, and combative to the driver because of his choice of a dancing girl in his car.  After watching the video (which the passenger herself filmed), what SELs and scenarios should a lesson plan address?  Possible questions for discussion appear after the video:




  • Who is the bully?  The passenger or the driver?
  • Who is the actual racist?  The passenger or the driver?
  • Who should be offended?  The passenger or the driver?
  • Who is being rude and entitled?  The passenger or the driver?


The passenger filming the encounter is Annelise Nielsen (a non-Hawaiian) who might just be a bit exclusive herself and not accepting of just anyone.  For someone triggered by a hula girl on a dashboard, she might not be too concerned about other women’s feelings who aren’t accepted as members of her secret and closed Facebook group.  Is this a bit of hypocrisy or is this just how SJWs roll?  From Inside the elite, super-secret world of L.A.’s coolest girls on Facebook:



The article continues:

annaliese 2

Does this sound like groups of Social Justice Warriors intolerant of viewpoints that are just a bit different than theirs?   How do they determine that they are the morality/culture police?  Who has given them that capability to decide what is acceptable and what isn’t?  We’ve seen how SJW curriculum plays out at the University of Missouri with the Melissa Click video from the University of Missouri.  Is Nielsen’s video indicative how SJW outrage plays outside of academia?

How would Common Core SELs address this scenario in a Lyft ride and who is the real bully?  Is this video an example of authentic concerns or is this an extension of a Mean Girls Club?  How would a CCSS assessment score Nielsen’s behavior?  How would it score the Lyft driver’s behavior?  Was he correct in making her leave his car?  Who was most abusive?  Nielsen or the Lyft driver?  Whatever happened to polite discourse?  How do you stop the screaming? Do CCSS SEL lesson plans address those concerns or do they further the quest into division and rancor?

Perhaps Ms. Nielsen’s behavior got stuck on not being able to practice self-control on the first SEL CCSS goals listed on the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education website unless you agree that her behavior was acceptable and culturally appropriate:




She doesn’t exhibit mastery of the second stage of awareness:



While self-awareness is important in child development, if one’s self-awareness becomes discomforting and hateful just because your opinion is different than another person’s, then it needs to be called out as the President of the University of Chicago did for incoming freshmen in a letter:



diversity letter



If more colleges would follow the example of truly welcoming diverse opinions, robust debate, and the acknowledgement that the First Amendment applies to everyone, perhaps we would not witness the unfortunate loss of control by a SJW triggered by a bobblehead doll.  Please share your stories on how your children are being taught SELs in your state.

Gretchen Logue