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Here is an article from Momma’s Bear’s blog, written by a Tennessee group of moms teaching other moms (and dads) about the data grabbing on their children in public school.  This article is well done with graphics and information concerning personal student information being gathered for workforce development.  The moms have provided information from the following sources supporting their contention that those surveys principals say are “no big deal” are actually great cause for concern:

  • Data Quality Campaign
  • Research paper from AT&T partnering with DQC discussing the need for educational longitudinal data
  • Excerpts from Tennessee’s Race to the Top Application and the need for educational longitudinal data
  • Student data has not been in aggregate form for quite some time
  • The gutting of the Family Education Rights Privacy Act (FERPA)
  • The need for student data to track teachers
  • Screen shots of the Tripod Survey which includes extremely invasive data on students and their families

Many parents are concerned that Common Core allows for this data gathering.  The pro-Common Core organizations will tell you that CCSS have no connection with data gathering.  “It’s only standards” they say.  But along with the common standards come common assessments that need to be used to track student achievement and teacher/principal performance.  They are much more than “only standards”.  CCSS requires an enormous amount of data collection on students, teachers and principals to increase accountability measures.

CCSS are standards that are commonly coded and the National Education Data Model (NEDM) has over 400 data sets ready to be implemented with the common standards once there is a common system that all states can use.   These common data sets can be merged into educational data assessments that the DQC, AT&T, the Federal Government and private companies need to access to develop and track the workforce.  Educational assessments include not only academic achievement, but also social, economic, health information to determine where the child is in life and how the government ostensibly needs to help the child to a guaranteed outcome.

State P20 longitudinal data systems were given Federal money to upgrade to handle the common core educational assessments.  FERPA was re-regulated to allow student identified information to be shared widely with other federal/state agencies and third party researchers.  Parents need to go into their principals’ offices and ask about how FERPA will protect their students’ information since it now allows this data to be shared.  They also need to ask why such intrusive surveys such as Tripod are being used in educational settings without active parental permission.  Be sure to ask your principal if a Tripod survey or similar survey is being used in your child’s classroom:

Tripod Survey 1

tripod survey 2

tripod survey 3

One question I don’t see listed is: “Do you have a permission slip to take this survey”? 

These momma bears implore other moms and dads to “Wake up, Momma!”  That’s great advice.  Know about the data gathering that is occurring in school with your children supplying this information, probably without your knowledge.

 

 

 

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