relativism

The meme below appeared on twitter and was posted by a curriculum director who supports education reform.  It purportedly compares the differences between a traditional learner (antiquated) and a 21st Century Learner (the learner Common Core is preparing for the global community).

What do you think about the labels for these learners?  Some tweeters took exception to the last two labels in particular.   Is no right way, student constructs meaning, changes constantly the same definition as relativism?  Ambiguity and ‘whatever you think is correct’ seems to be important goals of the 21st Century Learner.

 

traditional learner v 21 century learner

Common Core is for the 21st Century Learner and there is a toolkit to hone the skills necessary:

P21 Common Core Toolkit – The Partnership for 21st …

www.p21.org/component/content/…/2…/1005-p21-commoncore-toolkit

A Guide to Aligning the Common Core State Standards with the Framework for 21st Century Skills Get the P21 COMMON CORE TOOLKIT Download Center. … into teaching and learning in ways that honor the fusion of the 3Rs and 4Cs.

 

Does a 21st Century Learner learn there is no one right answer?  Is a goal of a 21st Century Learner relativism?  Here is one educator’s opinion on those questions:

However, the purpose of Common Core is not revealed in the standards. It is revealed in the view that there are no absolute truths or values. It is revealed in the teaching of “higher order thinking” which is attained when a child no longer believes in right and wrong. It is revealed in the view that all that is new is better than what comes from previous generations of knowledge, and much more. Common Core is not just a set of standards. That we very well may have been deceived and that we fell for it with such unflinching obedience, and that there is the potential for total control in the hands of a few who may or may not exploit it, is what keeps this teacher and parent up at night.

Published December 2, 2014

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