frustrated parent letter
(click on graphic to enlarge)

 

Missouri schools are starting to experience with what early implementing Common Core states like New York and Kentucky found out about Common Core two years ago: it’s not higher or better.  Look what was was shared from a rural Missouri school:

 

stover letter

Proponents will say it’s an implementation issue.  That explanation falls flat as another parent from a different district contacted me to let me know that parent classes will be held so ‘parents can help their children with their math homework’.

The difficulty with math by children and adults doesn’t sound like an implementation problem; that sounds like  convoluted ways of solving math problems now necessitates parent classes so trainers can teach parents (many of them college educated) how to understand math problems.  DESE, other state agencies and education reformers can insist it’s all the fault of the teachers and districts for not understanding the implementation process, but common sense tells parents that’s just PR nonsense.  One mom reports  these ‘classes’ are also taking place in Nevada.

If you are invited to one of these ‘classes’, ask your superintendent who is leading the class, the trainer’s employer and if the district used money to pay this trainer to conduct the class.  Determine if the trainer is a district or state employee.  Ask where the trainer received his/her training to teach math strategies to parents. Ask if the trainer if he/she is paid by a non governmental organization for this training. 

American Spring writes in Rural Missouri School Can’t Give Grades: #HB1490:

This letter from Stover, a rural Missouri school district, speaks volumes about the effect Common Core Standards is having in our schools.

You can almost audibly hear the frustration in the teacher’s words. Imagine what the children are feeling.

If you pair this with the proposed Amendment 3, that is attempting to tie teacher’s jobs to performance, and state accreditation, you can see the clear and present danger this represents to rural districts.

They will be the next to fall, following poor urban districts in KC and St Louis.

 

Published September 26, 2014

 

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