Put away those tin foil hats.  It’s confirmed.  Data tracking will be done (if it’s not already) on your child without your permission.  Here’s a memo to the Common Core proponents: stop telling us the Common Core State Standards Initiative is “only standards” and has nothing to do with data.  From the lead in to Big Brother: Meet the Parents:

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politico and data

What the Politico piece doesn’t answer is HOW this data will be gathered.  It will be gathered by the common coded data sets and assessments ready to be rolled out when education is homogenized via the CCSSI.  Remember the 2010 document from Achieve stating the real reason for the standards?  From a previous post:

 

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Politico notes:

The amateur activists have already claimed one trophy, torpedoing a privately run, $100 million database set up to make it easier for schools to share confidential student records with private companies. The project, known as inBloom, folded this spring under tremendous parent pressure, just 15 months after its triumphal public launch.

Now, parents are rallying against another perceived threat: huge state databases being built to track children for more than two decades, from as early as infancy through the start of their careers.

Promoted by the Obama administration, the databases are being built in nearly every state at a total cost of well over $1 billion. They are intended to store intimate details on tens of millions of children and young adults — identified by name, birth date, address and even, in some cases, Social Security number — to help officials pinpoint the education system’s strengths and weaknesses and craft public policy accordingly.

The Education Department lists hundreds of questions that it urges states to answer about each child in the public school system: Did she make friends easily as a toddler? Was he disciplined for fighting as a teen? Did he take geometry? Does she suffer from mental illness? Did he go to college? Did he graduate? How much does he earn?

Here is Missouri we’ve been told DESE only collects 61 data points on students.  We don’t know what information is being assessed by the school districts.  We have been told by the Willard superintendent that the district collects a “massive” amount of data on their students.  We don’t know what the truth is about what’s being collected on students.

What we DO know is that there is the intention that enormous amount of data is to be gathered to help your child navigate his/her way through school and the government can help said child if he/she has a bad year due to hormones, family divorce, dad losing job, etc. by noting a downturn in “healthy” or acceptable data.  From http://occrl.illinois.edu/files/Projects/shifting_gears/Report/SG_Using_State_Data.pdf

 

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Data system 1

Your student (the consumer) will have the data to “help them select education and employment goals that best suit their needs”….based on their data tracking via the LDSs.  Is this code talk for putting kids into workforce slots based on their data?

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data system 2a

data system 2b

 

How can anyone who questions the data tracking be accused of having a tin foil hat when reading these reports from 2010 and not connecting the dots?  You would be foolish not to understand what the blueprint is:  it’s data tracking for meeting market needs for employers, not for the education of the student to determine what the student wants to do with his/her life.

We wrote about data sets and tracking coming along in March 2011.  From Pajamas Media Talks to Missouri Education Watchdog about Educational Data Warehousing on Human Capital:

Patrick Richardson of Pajamas Media talked to us recently about common core standards and the Longitudinal Data System. He has done a fine job detailing exactly how your child and family will be profiled via the educational data base and other federal agencies.

You may find his article on the plan for the Longitudinal Data System here.

And just what educational purpose does it serve to reveal your child’s eye color? Or gestational age at birth?

Read Richardson’s post from 3 years ago.  When you get to the link about the 2011 data sets, it’s unavailable.  However, access the waybackmachine’s link to the data sets.  You will note there were links in 2011 requesting blood type and eye color which have subsequently been removed:

(paste the following link in your browser bar to access):  https://web.archive.org/web/20120310115645/http://nces.sifinfo.org/datamodel/eiebrowser/techview.aspx?instance=studentElementarySecondary

Those two personal items are not in the 2014 version of the data sets (as well as the omission of dental prosthetics category).  Do you think they were dropped as doctor’s information will be merged into your student’s educational records?  How is it legal that the government be tracking your child to serve its purposes and private industry without your permission?

It’s not speculation any more, it’s a fact.  It’s not just tin foil hat wearers sounding the alarm from 3 years ago.  It’s here.

How are you going to stop it in your state?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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