chamber of commerce cronies
Add the Chamber of Commerce to this meme.

Chambers of Commerce are coming to the defense of the Common Core State Standards Initiative in a loud way.  They are appearing in state legislators’ offices, at State Board meetings, in legislative committee meetings defending the standards but offering no research/data to support the claims the standards will make kids “college and career ready” (and they don’t delineate exactly what that phrase means).

Michelle Malkin offers her opinion on the Chamber of Commerce and why it is supporting this data-less educational reform.  Excerpts from nationalreview.com and  The US Chamber of Commerce versus America:

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is a politically entrenched synod of special interests. These fat cats do not represent the best interests of American entrepreneurs, American workers, American parents and students, or Americans of any race, class, or age who believe in low taxes and limited government. The chamber’s business is the big business of the Beltway, not the business of mainstream America.

…If you are a parent or educator who opposes top-down federal education schemes such as Common Core that undermine local control, dumb down rigorous curricula, and threaten family privacy while enriching big business and lobbying groups, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce doesn’t speak for you.

…In the case of Common Core, the Chamber has made common cause with the left-wing, corporate-bashing Center for American Progress in a new Bootleggers and Baptists coalition. They are strange bedfellows who both profit from increased federal government intervention. For giant corporate publishers, such as Pearson and other big-business ventures backed by the Chamber, it’s all about cashing in on the public schools’ Common Core captive guinea pigs in testing, teaching, data collection, and data analysis.

For big-government advocacy groups, such as CAP, it’s all about diminishing state, local, and parental control over local education and curricular decisions, expanding Washington’s regulatory reach into the classroom, and ensuring the perpetuation of the Fed Ed bureaucracy.

When businesses get in the government handout line, it’s not a “public-private partnership.” It’s corporate welfare. It’s venture socialism. Whatever you call it, it stinks as much under Democrat administrations as it does under Republican ones.

Always beware of Washington business-boosters wearing false free-market facades.

 

The Chamber shows its true intent for education by protecting and encouraging the crony capitalism of education reform investors and providers.  It’s designed to set in place the structures to measure workforce readiness.  From wisconsinindependent.com and Disturbing testimony at hearing reveals what is at the core of Common Core support:

wisconsin chamber 1

This is similar to what we heard from Chamber representatives when a Common Core presentation was given before the Missouri State Board of Education members  The Chamber reps had nothing more than CCSSI talking points lifted from the CCSSI website, no powerpoint presentations, no research/documentation; just statements that students have to be globally competitive for 21st century jobs they didn’t (or couldn’t) describe.

This particular excerpt from the Wisconsin hearing is really what the Chamber of Commerce is delivering to your state boards and legislators:

wisconsin chamber 2

 

Your human capital doesn’t need to be educated and pursue a life of liberty, no, your children are expected to learn work skills to serve the business interests and workforce of the country.  Remember our post about the 10 year data predictions from ESP Solutions Group written in 2006?  Those predictions (or wishes) will be realized (or not) by 2016.  Many of them have come true and laws have been changed by the Department of Education to allow easier transfer of data.  Students are now considered “Return on Investments (ROI)” and the money must be spent wisely on this human capital.

The most important stakeholders in this Common Core plan, taxpayers and parents (who were conveniently left out of the crafting), are becoming increasingly vocal and concerned about how their students are considered capital and ROI instead of free human beings.  Watch this video from the People LLC and a  mom’s excellent speech to the Louisiana House Education Committee on educational reforms:

 

This mother draws attention to the Chamber of Commerce speaker’s description of children as “human capital”.  The Chamber can spend millions on a PR campaign on why they need skilled workers.  They can try to put it in a nice box with a pretty bow and assure legislators it is for the good of business.  It’s too bad they don’t have any research/data to back those contentions.  It’s too bad the parents are starting to refuse to have their children used as human capital.   As Michelle Malkin reminded us, the Chamber is a politically entrenched synod of special interests. These fat cats do not represent the best interests of American entrepreneurs, American workers, American parents and students, or Americans of any race, class, or age who believe in low taxes and limited government. The chamber’s business is the big business of the Beltway, not the business of mainstream America.

There was more eye-opening testimony in Wisconsin from a CPA who attended an Appleton Chamber of Commerce meeting in which Common Core was discussed.  She recounted the meeting:

wisconsin chamber 3

 

Read more here. The Chamber has laid out its interest and intent on seeing that CCSS continue for its own goals.  It admits its interests supersede parental authority in making decisions for students.  It does NOT represent parents or students who are being forced into educational reform that is not based on educational practice and has been crafted not by educational experts, but private companies funded by the Federal Government.   The CCSS Initiative IS the transformation of education and it has little (or nothing) to do with improving education. It will reform education into providing the development of skilled workers for businesses but it will not improve education for future free men and women.

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